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50 films in 2013 challenge and first reviews

I’m a big fan of the cinema, which is probably why I ended up there 38 times last year.  This sounds a lot, but with one of those Unlimited cards and a slight Batman obsession it didn’t feel like it.  In fact it felt like I should’ve gone more.  So in 2013 I’m aiming to…in fact I’m aiming to go 50 times this year.

I’ve bought a notebook to record each of the visits, but I’m also going to blog very short reviews here, because if the internet knows I’ve challenged myself to go 50 times then I kinda have to do it.  Why 50?  Well it’s a nice round number for starters, but that’s one a week with a two week holiday (or a two week break for when the only thing showing is Furious Paranormal Extreme Sawing VII or whatever crap is on).  Oh and it totally counts if I see more than one film in one visit because cinema days are awesome, but I’m not sure whether seeing the same film does yet.  I guess there are still a few things to figure out.

I’ve made some good progress…

1. Rise of the Guardians

The Immortal Guardians, including the Easter Bunny, Santa Claus, Sandman and the Tooth Fairy, require the help of Jack Frost to defeat the evil spirit Pitch Black / Bogeyman who aims to infect the world’s children with fear.

Despite being a film squarely aimed at kids this film was surprisingly enjoyable.  Hugh Jackman’s Easter Bunny with anger management issues and the yoda-like Sandman are particularly favourites as the team battle to save hope, belief, imagination and joy of children worldwide.  Leaving cynicism at the door this is fun-filled and sure there are some plot holes, but ultimately enjoyable. 4/5

2. Playing for Keeps

Gerrard Butler plays an ex-football superstar who has never really learnt to deal with life off the pitch.  As he arrives back in the hometown of his ex-wife and son he tries to bond with his son through coaching the local football team, where he also catches the eye of the local Soccer Moms.  But can he convince his ex-wife he still loves her before she marries someone else?

Squared fairly in the romantic comedy genre this film was trying to be so much but ultimately failing.  Well known actors like Catherine Zeta-Jones, Uma Thurman and Dennis Quaid are criminally under-utilised in a film which just never really hits its mark.  Someone needed to go through this script with a red pen because it could’ve been a lot better.  Falls into the nothing-better-to-do afternoon on the telly viewing if you’re going to watch.  Shame really. 1.5/5

3. Life of Pi

Adapted from the best-selling novel by Yann Martel this is the story of a young man whose family set sail for the West in search of a better life, only for him to survive a shipwreck which sees him stranded on a lifeboat with a bengal tiger.

Largely believed to be an unfilmable book, Ang Lee does a decent job of making this a watchable film, but ultimately I still think it’s one best left to the page.  The fantastical, magical realism of a man and a tiger adrift was beautiful but lacked much real sense of fear.  An enjoyable twist to the tale is lost in what is a juddering ending which doesn’t give the audience time to consider the alternatives.  Ultimately a visual display which is worth seeing if only for the tiger, but probably best to read the book. 3/5

4. The Impossible

Based on a true-life tale of one family’s fight to be reunited after the Boxing Day Tusnami in 2006.  Maria, Henry and their three sons are holidaying in Thailand when a wall of water destroys almost everything in its wake, splitting the family and leaving behind an incredible devastation.

A brave story of a terrible natural disaster is let down by a terrible music placement.  The scene-setting calming waters are interrupted by a farcical Jaws-like theme and deeply emotional scenes are ruined with imposing, ill placed tunes.  Aside from that the film has great casting, particularly that of Tom Holland who plays Lucas, a character who steals the show.  The gratuitous shots of Naomi Watts is disappointing, as is the film’s treatment of the indigenous people who seem to exist only as help for the westerners, even in the aftermath when thousands lost their life.    An attempt at giving a more identifiable view to an overwhelming natural disaster which just fell short. 2.5/5

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