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Three Winters at The Old Rep Theatre

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I can’t say I knew much about Three Winters before I showed up to the theatre, jogging up the road thanks to Birmingham’s Saturday early-evening traffic.  I try not to read much about a performance, be it theatre or film, before I go because I like to make my own mind up, and then read the reviews after.

Three Winters, it turns out, is a play which takes place during three different winters; just after the Second Word War in 1945, during the Balkans war in the 1990s, and finally in contemporary Croatia in 2011.  Written by Croatian playwright Tena Štivičić, premiering in London in 2014, the play takes place in a house in Zagreb, where Štivičić grew up and follows generations of the Kos family.

Whilst the story is about the Kos family throughout the three time periods, it’s very much the women that are the central characters.  We first meet Rose King, who secures a home for her, her husband and their daughter Maša, in part of the house during the Communist era of the country.  In the 90s Maša has grown up and married to history-teacher husband Vlado, but still living in the house with their two young daughters.  With the 2011 scenes take place on the eve of Maša and Vlado’s youngest daughter Lucija’s wedding.

Of the play itself, the narrative is slow to start as it introduces the elements of the story the play will weave together.  Growing up, the Balkans war was often something on the news but something my knowledge of is hazy.  So whilst the story works with little understanding of the time period, as a family drama through several generations, I do wonder if more historical context might add more richness to the audience’s understanding of the play.

Produced and performed by the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire (final year students from what was formerly known as Birmingham School of Acting), there is little to show that this was not an entirely professional production of graduate actors.  The acting was strong and compelling and the use of projected images and music during the transitions added another layer of history to the stories of the family members.  For a play where two thirds of the eras take place just before or after war, it is a surprisingly funny play which elicits genuine and knowing laughter from the audience, often as a result of family dynamics, and delivered perfectly.

I wasn’t overly sold on the dance performance piece at the beginning of the play, which may well be part of the original, although with the more celebratory dance at the end, it did add a sense of bookending the play.

I can’t remember what made me book a ticket to see Three Winters at the Old Rep Theatre, but having enjoyed the production I will be checking out other shows by the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire.

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