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American Idiot the Musical at The Alexandra theatre

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Green Day never belonged to me, they were always my sister’s band. We were both pop-punk fans, but I never got Green Day in the way she did. I understood the impact of Dookie and started to warm up to them around the time of Warning, but American Idiot sealed it for me. It was strong, slick and full of stories. It was hardly surprising to me that it would be the album that would be a musical, especially given the whole “punk rock opera” moniker it was given, but I did wonder how it would play out.

American Idiot the Musical kicks off with the titular song. It introduces the audience to a group of disaffected teenagers, fed up of the state of their country, mass media and the deal they’ve been dealt. During a series of songs from the album we learn that a trio of the group, Johnny, Will and Tunny are unhappy with their suburban lives, with Johnny’s revelation of a broken home and living in a world “that don’t believe in me” (Jesus of Suburbia). The trio plan to escape their lives, but on finding out his girlfriend is pregnant, Will stays at home, with Johnny and Tunny heading off to the city.

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Struggling to adjust to urban life, Tunny enlists in the army and Johnny turns to drugs. Injecting heroin for the first time, we are introduced to Johnny’s alter-ego, St Jimmy, which gives him a new-found courage to talk to the girl he’s had a crush on. Meanwhile, Tunny is deployed to a war zone, and Will is struggling to adjust to life at home without his friends and the impending birth of his child, both needing relief from their situations. But for Johnny, things seem to be going well, at least temporarily; in a drug-fuelled haze he gets the girl, beds her and things seem to be going well. That is until St Jimmy and the drugs take over, and surpass the love he has for his girlfriend.

 

Back in the army, Tunny, now an amputee, is being tended to by a nurse, known as Extraordinary Girl, who he eventually falls in love with. Will’s girlfriend has their child, and grows increasingly impatient with his loser lifestyle of drugs and lazing on the sofa. Johnny is descending into an increasingly drug-addled state and threatens his girlfriend Whatshername followed by himself. She leaves him and realising what he’s lost he gets clean and tries to get a desk job before realising it’s not for him and heading for the bus back home. Will, sees his girlfriend with her new rock-star boyfriend but eventually she and Will call a truce and he embraces his child. Tunny introduces them to Extraordinary Girl and it takes a while for Johnny to forgive him for leaving him for the army, but finally, the trio are reunited.

American Idiot Production_Mark Dawson Photography_DSC_2775American Idiot the Musical is a wonderful chaotic mess. The first fifteen minutes or so feel like an attempt to cram in as many of the higher octane songs as possible to set the scene; I liked the run through of songs but less so the toilet-humour antics, which just feel a bit like watching your parents try and pretend they know what teenagers are like. Thankfully the show seems to get it out of its system once the plot starts to appear. I mean sure, the plot is superficial but the split narrative about three young men who are all searching for meaning in their lives does work and particularly in the second half does have some touching moments.

Waterloo Road’s Tom Milner as Johnny has the unenviable job of playing the link in the trio, dealing with the descent into drugs and the grittier side of Billie Joe Armstrong’s vocals. It’s a hard thing to master and makes you realise just how skilled Green Day’s vocalist it, but Milner gives it heart. Perhaps the strongest performance of the night comes from local lad, West Brom’s own Joshua Dowen, who plays Tunny and delivers some of the most powerful vocal performances of the evening. Luke Friend, 2013’s X Factor third place runner-up, does a superb job playing the maniacal St Jimmy, the Fight Club style alter-ego who courts Johnny into the world of drugs and delusion.

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Whether it is intentional that both Green Day and American Idiot the Musical are a trio of men, it does feel like the female characters are there less as characters and more as motivations for the male leads. But somehow, despite all the issues, I found myself absorbed in the story. Even the ending, cliched as it was, with Good Riddance (Time of Your Life) reworked so that it was more musical, got me. And maybe that’s the best way to think of it: “It’s something unpredictable, but in the end it’s right. I hope you had the time of your life.” And maybe American Idiot the Musical wasn’t the time of my life, but it left me feeling nostalgic and hopeful. And that’s not a bad way to leave a musical.

American Idiot the Musical is on at the Alexandra Theatre from Tuesday 9 – Saturday 13 April 2019. Tickets are available via the Alex’s website.

This was a press event. Photos and their copyright belong to Mark Dawson.

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